Defying the
Ordinary and the Conventional

 
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Our Visionary, St. EOM

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Eddie Owens Martin, a self-taught Southern artist, drew inspiration from many colorful cultures to develop the 7-acre, internationally recognized visionary art environment known as Pasaquan.

Martin’s artistic journey started at age 14 when he left his hometown of Buena Vista, Georgia, to embark on a hitchhiking adventure to Atlanta and Washington, D.C., before settling in New York. In the Big Apple, he worked as a street hustler, bartender, gambler and drag queen. He even gave fortunetelling a try at age 37.

In 1957, after the death of his mother, Martin came home to Georgia and continued his fortunetelling flair for pay. Donning ravishing robes and feathered headdresses, Eddie moved into his mother's old farmhouse and used his oracle occupation to help fund his vision of Pasaquan.

Martin also changed his name to St. EOM (pronounced Ohm) and became the first Pasaquoyan. He continued to work on the art environment for 30 years, creating six major structures, mandala murals and more than 900 feet of elaborately painted masonry walls.

Pasaquan lavishly fuses African, pre-Columbian Mexico and Native American cultural and religious symbols and designs, along with motifs inspired by Edward Churchward’s books about “The Lost Continent of MU.”

After a few years of declining health, St. EOM committed suicide in 1986. Pasaquan began to fade — literally and figuratively. For 30 years, the Pasaquan Preservation Society (PPS) worked tirelessly to preserve the site. During 2014, philanthropic organization Kohler Foundation Inc., PPS and Columbus State University partnered to bring the visionary art site back to life.

 
 

Transcending the Typical Tourism Experience.

 
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Begin Your Journey

The Visionary Odyssey is a creative and artistic voyage through the heart of the Chattahoochee Valley. This unforgettable day trip guides you through a succession of sensory experiences at sites throughout southwest Georgia and southeast Alabama—starting with the internationally recognized visionary art environment Pasaquan, moving on to the field-to-glass artisan distillery Richland Rum and the hometown craft brewer Omaha Brewing Company, and ending at the unique and bizarre Alabama Museum of Wonder. The Visionary Odyssey is a journey that defies the ordinary and the conventional, transcending the typical tourism loop. With each destination, you will feel a connection to authenticity, individuality, and excellence. Indeed, the Visionary Odyssey offers you the opportunity to experience the life's work of amazing artists and creators in our region and to witness firsthand the results of their passions.

Let your Visionary Odyssey begin!

 

Economic Impact

On October 22nd, 2016 Pasaquan reopened to the public and 2200 visitors, from 34 states, and 14 countries came to Marion County and the site that day.  Buena Vista, Pasaquan, Richland Rum, and Omaha Brewery worked together to make that happen. Since opening 13 months ago, Pasaquan has had 3160 visitors at the site an average of 72 visitors a week, and Pasaquan is only open three days a week and closed the month of Dec. and July.

01. CNN'S 16 INTRIGUING THINGS TO SEE AND DO IN THE USA

Pasaquan is more than a place—it’s a spirit, a way of thinking about the world that unites all people of all beliefs at one time.

02. RECENTLY RENOVATED AND REOPENED

On October 22nd, 2016 Pasaquan reopened to the public and 2200 visitors, from 34 states, and 14 countries came to Marion County and the site that day. 

03. COMING TOGETHER TO
HELP THE COMMUNITY

Over the last year, since the opening of Pasaquan, the organizations along the Visionary Odyssey have established a synergy and have already worked together on several projects.

04. NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL REACH

Several events and many articles in international and national publications have made Pasaquan a travel destination.